redazione's blog

One of the main activities of the WE GO! project consisted in a data collection involving the antiviolence centres partners in the project, and 5 other centres based in Greece. The centres are based in 4 EU countries: 1 in Bulgaria, 6 in Greece, 3 in Italy and 2 in Spain. The purpose of the data collection was to contribute to build knowledge on the specific issue of the economic needs of women survivors of IPV, focusing specifically on their socio-economic characteristics.

One of the main activities of the WE GO! project consisted in a data collection involving the antiviolence centres partners in the project, and 5 other centres based in Greece. The centres are based in 4 EU countries: 1 in Bulgaria, 6 in Greece, 3 in Italy and 2 in Spain. The purpose of the data collection was to contribute to build knowledge on the specific issue of the economic needs of women survivors of IPV, focusing specifically on their socio-economic characteristics.

One of the main activities of the WE GO! project consisted in a data collection involving the antiviolence centres partners in the project, and 5 other centres based in Greece. The centres are based in 4 EU countries: 1 in Bulgaria, 6 in Greece, 3 in Italy and 2 in Spain. The purpose of the data collection was to contribute to build knowledge on the specific issue of the economic needs of women survivors of IPV, focusing specifically on their socio-economic characteristics.

WE GO! is an ambitious project willing to strengthen strategies and methodologies to support women undergoing intimate partner violence (IPV) to become economically independent and leave violent relationships.

Intimate partner violence is a widespread problem in Europe. Based on data gathered by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA), 1 in 4 women is physically or sexually abused by her own partner.

Women living in violent relationships often don’t break them off, as they lack financial independence and wouldn’t be able to provide for themselves and their children. Moreover, financial support programs are often amongst the most sacrificed activities led by anti-violence centres, due to the lack of human and financial resources.